Hybridisation within the wheat (Triticum aestivum) - Elytrigia intermedia - E. repens species complex: a probable case of crop – wild relative gene flow.

Name: Hybridisation within the wheat (Triticum aestivum) - Elytrigia intermedia - E. repens species complex: a probable case of crop – wild relative gene flow.
Researchers: Fehrer Judith (member in research team)
Jarolímová Vlasta (member in research team)
Mahelka Václav (member in research team)
Trávníček Pavel (member in research team)
Project Type: B - national grants (GA ČR, GA AVČR)
Realization from: 2005
Realization to: 2007
Summary: Namely with respect to the release of genetically modified crops, hybridisation between crops and wild relatives has emerged as a potential problem for biodiversity in agro- and natural ecosystems. Because we know that gene flow can occur but we don\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\'t know how the genes can influence natural ecosystems, it is necessary to evaluate the possibility of gene flow before the genetically modified crop is released into the environment. As species of the genus Elytrigia are among the most important sources of valuable biological traits for selection of wheat, namely experimental crosses between E. intermedia and Triticum aestivum have been carried out over a long time to date. If plants do hybridise in the field as well, this example is of crucial interest. Because E. intermedia readily crosses with E. repens, it can serve as a bridge for the escape of genes from wheat into E. repens. In that case, Triticum aestivum, Elytrigia intermedia and E. repens provide a suitable model for the study of gene flow with consequences not only in relatively natural, but also in man-made habitats. For detection of hybridisation/introgression between wheat and E. intermedia and between E. intermedia and E. repens, a large number of E. intermedia and E. repens plants collected in the field at localities where all three species co-occur, will be tested using suitable molecular markers which would allow us to detect hybridisation/introgression even at very low frequencies.

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