Vegetation succession in human-made habitats: variability on broad spatial scales

Name: Vegetation succession in human-made habitats: variability on broad spatial scales
Researchers: Prach Karel (international coordinator)
Project Type: A - major international projects (at least 3 states)
Realization from: 2007
Realization to: 2010
Summary: Spatial-temporal variability of successional changes will be studied using vegetation records in abandoned fields, sand-gravel pits, artificial islands in fishponds, extracted peatlands and stone quarries. The role of driving environmental variables (climate, abiotic site factors, species pool) will be investigated. The following hypotheses will be tested: a) Succession is convergent within a site, but divergent on a broader spatial scale; b) pH of substratum determines the ruderal/non-ruderal succession; c) Participation of species typical for (semi)natural habitats is determined by the occurrence of the respective habitats in the close proximity of a target site; d) The most sensitive to invasions are early, but not initial seral stages; in later successional stages invasive species tend to disappear; e) Data obtained by space-for-time substitution and by chronosequence do not differ. Results are expected to contribute to both successional theory and practical restoration ecology.

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